Friday, 23 March 2012

Research: Walking Changes in Mild MS

Epub ahead of print: Sosnoff et al. Quantifying gait abnormalities in persons with multiple sclerosis with minimal disability Gait Posture. 2012 Mar 17.

Source

Abnormalities in gait kinematics in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) who have mild disability have been noted using motion capture systems. However, it is not clear if these abnormalities can be detected with clinically feasible technology. This investigation examined if the spatiotemporal markers of gait including variability metrics can distinguish between PwMS with minimal disability and controls with clinically feasible technology. 43 PwMS with minimal disability and 43 healthy controls completed four walking trials along a 26 foot long pressure sensitive pathway (GAITRite). Spatiotemporal markers of gait including variability metrics were determined. Statistical analysis revealed that PwMS walked slower, with fewer, shorter, wider steps and spent a greater percentage of a gait cycle in double support than controls. Additionally, PwMS had greater variability in the time between steps, single support percent and step width than controls. Collectively, the results highlight that PwMS, in the absence of clinical gait impairment, have subtle but detectable differences in gait and that these alterations can be detected with clinically feasible technology. The current results raise the possibility of targeting walking deviations earlier in disability progression in PwM.



Interesting that walking studies are high on the agenda, now that Fampridine for walking is available. However Prof G has been saying from many years that we have find more responsive outcomes than EDSS that will help detect subtle effects. This has been studying stride [gait] and can detect changes in the way MSers walk.

1 comment:

  1. I also wonder whether MSers use their arms more when walking to help with the rhythm and balance

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